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Min-reviews: Muse of Nightmares + Marilla of Green Gables

Muse of Nightmares (Strange the Dreamer, #2) by Laini Taylor
pub 10/2/18 by Little, Brown Books
for Young Readers
Young Adult - Fantasy
Borrowed ARC from Alexa
Where do I even begin? Laini Taylor is one of those authors whose scope of imagination never fails amazes me. To come up with these vivid fantastical worlds and memorable characters — she really has a gift. With Strange the Dreamer, it was a slow burn and then suddenly I was 100% invested. I can’t even pinpoint when. But with Muse of Nightmares, I went in needing to know where the story would lead Lazlo, Sarai, their friends and the rest of the godspawn. I was basically hooked from page one. The plot took so many unexpected turns forward but also gave us a much needed glimpse of the past. Where did the gods come from and why? And more importantly, why happened to all the children born in the Citadel? A ton of questions were answered and in brilliants way I didn’t expect. But at the heart of it was the beautiful love story between Lazlo and Sarai and what family means to each of them plus the other godspawn (Minya, Sparrow, Ruby and Feral). It’s both moving and heartbreaking which describes practically everything Laini Taylor writes. I don’t know if she plans to do any more books in this world but regardless, I cannot wait to see what she comes up with next.

Do I recommend? Absolutely! Long-time fans will not be disappointed and if you haven’t read any of these author’s books yet, now is a good time to start!


pub 10/23/18 by William Morrow
Adult - Fiction
Received from pub via Edelweiss
Who didn’t wonder about Marilla’s story after she told Anne that “people called him [John Blythe] her beau”? I just never expected anyone to actually write it! Enter Sarah McCoy who tells Marilla’s story is such a satisfying and moving way. It’s admittedly a bit strange to start a book knowing where the main character’s life will end up but that didn’t make the journey getting there any less enjoyable or surprising to read about. We start off with Marilla as a young thirteen year old girl and it was funny and slightly exasperating (in a good way) to see just how Marilla she was even at a young age. Practical to the core, that one. We learn about her family beyond just Matthew and the experiences that ended up shaping her - namely the death of her mother. It was heartbreaking to read but also hopeful to see the seeds of what was to come as the author also writes about Marilla as an older teenager. We learn about the aunt who inspired her to look beyond her life in Avonlea, the friendship she finds in Rachel Lynde and the blossoming relationship with John Blythe. The story was even surprisingly historical and political but it made sense and gave depth to the time Marilla was living in. In so many ways it made me both understand and love her more.

Do I recommend? Absolutely! It’s a must-read for any Anne of Green Gables fan who wants to learn about Marilla.

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